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Cocktails

Golden Age of Cocktails

Gold Bar takes you back over a hundred years ago, when people learned to love mixed drinks. The most iconic cocktails date back to this era – The Martini, the Daiquiri, the Manhattan – Classics that we still enjoy to this day. It was during this period that bartending evolved, and complexity was explored in cocktail structures such as the Sour, the Fizz, the Julep, and even within Punch. Gold Bar takes all these creations to contemporary, sophisticated levels, incorporating modern techniques and local Japanese flavors.
Fizz & Sling

Fizz & Sling

One of the original hangover cures, the Fizz has gone through countless iterations since its first recorded mention in the 1860s. Consisting of simply Spirit, Citrus, Sweetener and Effervescence, what started as a "corpse reviver" began its ascendancy towards cocktail celebrity, eventually taking its place alongside the Sling and the Collins. The most recognizable concoctions of this type are the Ramos Gin Fizz, invented in 1888 by Henry Charles Ramos of the New Orleans Imperial Cabinet and the Singapore Sling, from the Raffles Hotel, in Singapore, of course.    

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Sour

Sour

If there's an upside to British Imperialism, it just might be the Sour, a cocktail that officially dates back to the 1860s, but has its roots in the Grog consumed by the British Navy, long before that time. When sailing back from the tropics, their official libation was rum, often mixed with lime juice to prevent scurvy and malnutrition - kind of a proto-Daiquiri, if you will - and that, matey, is the origin of the Sour variations we know and love today.
Punch

Punch

The New York Times published a recipe for Planter's Punch in 1908, affirming the popularity of this style of drink, and yet many a cocktail historian might say, "Punch began with the British East India trade:  English sailors ran out of beer, and they ran out of wine, and you can't have a boat full of English sailors without anything to drink. So, someone had the idea, "What if we make artificial wine from spirits, softened with sugar, citrus, water, and spices collected along the way?" Surely this is how it started, and how the structure evolved over the next hundred years.
Martini & Manhattan

Martini & Manhattan

What are classics?  "Cocktails that stand the test of time."  Almost everyone knows these touchstones, but their origins are somewhat obscured by the cobwebs of the ages. All the same, they've been enjoyed since the 19th century, and unlike other cocktails, their recipes haven't changed, which makes these two creations the greatest in the history of cocktails.